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Emergency Notifications

for College of San Mateo, Cañada College and Skyline College

Excessive Heat Warning Issued for Bay Area for Labor Day Weekend

An excessive heat warning was issued Wednesday morning by the National Weather Service as an area of high pressure settled over the western United States. The excessive heat warning is the highest alert issued by the NWS, and was upgraded from an excessive heat watch issued on Monday. (Whiting, 2022)

The California grid operator is asking Californians to reduce their electricity use between 4 and 9pm on Thursday through Tuesday to ease the strain on the power grid caused by high temperatures and air conditioning use — for example by setting the thermostat to 78 degrees or higher (and 85 degrees for those who are not at home). Another energy-saving request has already been issued for Thursday between 4 and 9pm, and more such requests, known as Flex Alerts, are likely during the Labor Day weekend as the worst of the heat wave hits.

Meteorologists predict all-time daily records on Saturday in Gilroy at 107, and Sunday in Livermore where it may approach or top the 113 degree set in 1950. Regionally, all areas were expected to record temperatures between 10 and 25 degrees above the daily average for Sunday and Monday.

What can you do?

  • Avoid being outdoor during the late morning and afternoon
  • Stay hydrated in a cool place
  • Use air conditioning if available
  • Use shade, sunblock, and misters

Take measures to stay cool, stay hydrated, and stay informed. Getting too hot can make you sick. You can become ill from the heat if your body can’t compensate for it and properly cool you off. The main things affecting your body’s ability to cool itself during extremely hot weather are:

  • High humidity. When the humidity is high, sweat won’t evaporate as quickly. This keeps your body from releasing heat as fast as it may need to.
  • Personal factors. Age, obesity, fever, dehydration, heart disease, mental illness, poor circulation, sunburn, and prescription drug and alcohol use all can play a role in whether a person can cool off enough in very hot weather.
Senior woman drinking from a water bottle outdoors with senior man wiping his face with towel.

People aged 65 and older are at high risk for heat-related illnesses.

Those who are at highest risk include people 65 and older, children younger than two, and people with chronic diseases or mental illness.

Closely monitor people who depend on you for their care and ask these questions:

  • Are they drinking enough water?
  • Do they have access to air conditioning?
  • Do they need help keeping cool?

People at greatest risk for heat-related illness can take the following protective actions to prevent illness or death:

  • Stay in air-conditioned buildings as much as you can. Air-conditioning is the number one way to protect yourself against heat-related illness and death. If your home is not air-conditioned, reduce your risk for heat-related illness by spending time in public facilities that are air-conditioned and using air conditioning in vehicles. Contact your local health department or locate an air-conditioned shelter in your area.
  • Do not rely on a fan as your main cooling device during an extreme heat event.
  • Drink more water than usual and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink.
  • Check on a friend or neighbor and have someone do the same for you.
  • Limit use of the stove and oven—it will make you and your house hotter.

Even young and healthy people can get sick from the heat if they participate in strenuous physical activities during hot weather:

  • Limit your outdoor activity, especially midday when the sun is hottest.
  • Pace your activity. Start activities slowly and pick up the pace gradually.
  • Drink more water than usual and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink more. Muscle cramping may be an early sign of heat-related illness.
  • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.

If you play a sport that practices during hot weather, protect yourself and look out for your teammates:

  • Schedule workouts and practices earlier or later in the day when the temperature is cooler.
  • Monitor a teammate’s condition and have someone do the same for you.
  • Seek medical care right away if you or a teammate has symptoms of heat-related illness.
  • Learn more about how to protect young athletes from heat-related illness by taking this CDC course.

Everyone should take these steps to prevent heat-related illnesses, injuries, and death during hot weather:

  • Stay in an air-conditioned indoor location as much as you can.
  • Drink plenty of fluids even if you don’t feel thirsty.
  • Schedule outdoor activities carefully.
    • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing and sunscreen.
    • Pace yourself.
  • Take cool showers or baths to cool down.
  • Check on a friend or neighbor and have someone do the same for you.
  • Never leave children or pets in cars.
  • Check the local news for health and safety updates.

***For more information: visit the CDC at https://www.cdc.gov/nceh/features/extremeheat/index.html

Cañada College Closure Update

June 21, 2022

Update 8:10 pm

The evacuation orders are being lifted in the areas surrounding Cañada College. College instruction and business will resume as normal on Wednesday, June 22nd at 5 a.m.

We will continue to monitor the event and provide updates as necessary.

If you need assistance on campus contact Public Safety at (650) 738-7000.

Canada College Power Outage

February 1, 2022


The power was temporarily out at Cañada College and the surrounding area.  PG&E has successfully restored power to the college, but may have still have some outages in the surrounding area.   Estimated time of power for full restoration is 10.15 pm. 

Evening classes are still in progress at this time.

If you need assistance on campus contact Public Safety at (650)738 7000.

For PG&E information go to:

https://pgealerts.alerts.pge.com/outagecenter/

Travel and Health During Spring Break, and Fall 2021 FAQ

March 24, 2021

Spring break is coming and we want you to be safe and responsible. As the vaccination rate continues to grow and COVID cases decline, we still need to stay vigilant. Here are some things you can do:

Limit Your Socializing
Attending parties and gatherings can still spread COVID. Make responsible decisions that will minimize exposures:

  • Limit contact with people outside your household.
  • Always wear your mask, practice social distancing, and sanitize whenever you are around others outside your social bubble.

Limit Travel
Travel increases your chance of getting and spreading COVID-19, especially in states that have relaxed their safety protocols. If you travel more than 120 miles from the Bay Area for more than 24 hours, you are required to self-quarantine before you return to work or any in-person classes. See District travel requirements.

If You Attend a Gathering, Get Tested!
If you attend a gathering, it is advised to get a COVID-19 test three to five days later—whether you think you were exposed or not. This can help you from spreading the virus to others. Free drive-through COVID-19 testing is available Sunday–Thursdays at the College of San Mateo campus. Visit the COVID-19 Testing webpage to learn more.

Explaining the Decision to Remain Mostly Online for Fall 2021
Following the District’s decision to remain mostly in online education and remote work modality through Fall 2021, there have been many questions about the factors that went into this decision. The District is working on a gradual return of more instructional programs and student services if possible this fall, but we are taking precautions. Watch this video to learn more.

Please follow public health order practices. Collectively, we can stop spreading the virus. It’s the only way we will return to our campuses. Have a great spring break!


Employee Vaccination Update – March 10

March 10, 2021

Much of the Bay Area is in Phase 1B of the State vaccination plan, which includes eligible essential workers such as educators, child care providers, law enforcement and food and agricultural workers.

Vaccination appointments are now available to educators at many locations around the Bay Area. District personnel are encouraged to register at MyTurn.ca.gov for a vaccination appointment. You can also register family members to see if they qualify.

If you are unable to get an appointment, keep trying daily at MyTurn.ca.gov. Appointment availability and locations change frequently.

The District is developing plans for on-campus vaccination capabilities in the future, likely with the anticipated return to campuses in Spring 2022.  More information will be shared once available.

Vaccination information is also available on the website vaccinefinder.org.

Depending on your age and other factors, you may also be to sign up for a vaccination appointment through your regular healthcare provider (see list of providers and their vaccination websites). 

COVID-19 Testing
San Mateo County operates a public testing location at College of San Mateo, in upper Hillsdale Lot 1. Testing hours are Sundays – Thursdays, 11am to 7pm. The site is open to the public and to all District employees and students. Sign up for an appointment at the LHI testing website.

Related Links
San Mateo County Vaccination Website
San Mateo County Vaccine Equity Plan
San Mateo County Testing information
California State Vaccination Plan

Bay Area County Vaccination Websites
Alameda County
Contra Costa County
Marin County
Napa County
San Francisco County
Santa Clara County
Solano County


SMCCCD employee update on COVID-19 testing and vaccinations

February 26, 2021

San Mateo County is currently in Phase 1B of the State vaccination plan, which includes eligible essential workers such as educators, child care providers, law enforcement and food and agricultural workers.

At this point, San Mateo County is prioritizing K-12 educators. We do not yet know when District personnel will be qualified for vaccination under the San Mateo County plan.

Meanwhile, we encourage all employees to sign up for a vaccination appointment through your regular healthcare provider (see list of providers and their vaccination websites). 

San Mateo County residents can sign up online to be notified when they are eligible for the vaccine. Anyone in California can sign up to find out if they are eligible for vaccination—and be notified when it’s their turn—at https://myturn.ca.gov/.

COVID-19 Testing
San Mateo County operates a public testing location at College of San Mateo, in upper Hillsdale Lot 1. Testing hours have changed to Sundays – Thursdays, 11am to 7pm. The site is open to the public and to all District employees and students. Sign up for an appointment at the LHI testing website.

Related Links
San Mateo County Vaccination Website
San Mateo County Vaccine Equity Plan
San Mateo County Testing information
California State Vaccination Plan

Bay Area County Vaccination Websites
Alameda County
Contra Costa County
Marin County
Napa County
San Francisco County
Santa Clara County
Solano County


Regional Stay At Home Order In Effect at 11:59pm Thursday

December 16, 2020 – San Mateo County and 10 other Bay Area counties are now under a mandatory Regional Stay At Home Order as of Thursday, Dec. 17, at 11:59 pm. The order will stay in effect for at least three weeks.

Private gatherings of any size are prohibited, except for outdoor church services and political demonstrations. Restaurants must stop offering in-person dining and can offer only take-out and delivery. Many businesses and activities must close, including salons and barbershops. Retail can remain open at 20 percent capacity. Nonessential travel and the use of hotels or short-term rentals for leisure is banned.

The Stay At Home Order was triggered due to a surge in COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations, and a decline in ICU capacity, in San Mateo County. Regional ICU capacity has fallen to 12.9%, and the case positivity 14-day average in San Mateo County is now 8%, up from 2.1% in early November. State and County metrics are available at the California COVID-19 Dashboard.

How does this affect our District and Colleges?
Education is categorized as an essential activity under the Stay At Home Order. The limited, previously planned, on-campus classes and other operations will continue as scheduled.

  • Essential employees working onsite should continue to report to work as scheduled.
  • Limited face-to-face classes will continue to meet on campus as planned.
  • Commuting to class or work is allowed for essential employees, and the students and instructors involved in scheduled face-to-face classes.

District academic and administrative operations had already been adjusted to comply with the requirements of the Stay At Home Order.

  • Indoor athletics and conditioning for sports teams at Cañada College, College of San Mateo, and Skyline College have been canceled.
  • Indoor operations at San Mateo Athletic Club have been canceled (the outdoor pool and outdoor fitness center remain open subject to COVID-19 restrictions).

What is still allowed under the Stay At Home Order?
These essential activities are permitted:

  • Going to the doctor
  • Buying groceries and picking up takeout food
  • Outdoor recreation like walking, hiking and cycling
  • Outdoor religious ceremonies
  • Retail operations and shopping centers at 20% capacity

Where is this in effect?
The Regional Stay At Home Order is in effect in the following counties:

  • Alameda
  • Contra Costa
  • Marin
  • Monterey
  • Napa
  • San Francisco
  • San Mateo
  • Santa Clara
  • Santa Cruz
  • Solano
  • Sonoma

More information

For a more detailed description of the order, why is was implemented, and what is open/closed, see the San Mateo County announcement.

Always check with trusted sources for the latest information:

San Mateo County residents can call 2-1-1 with non-medical, non-emergency questions about the coronavirus and local community resources, any time, day or night.


Stay-at-Home Orders in Effect for San Mateo County and Most of the Bay Area

November 29, 2020 — Almost all of the San Francisco Bay Area is now in the state’s purple tier, with a Stay-at-Home order in effect as of Monday. Everyone in the following counties is required to stay home (with certain exceptions) from 10pm to 5am until Dec. 21:

  • San Mateo County
  • San Francisco
  • Alameda County
  • Santa Clara County
  • Santa Cruz County
  • Solano County
  • Contra Costa County
  • Napa County
  • Sonoma County

The State of California rolled back those counties to the most restrictive level, purple Tier 1, on Saturday, Nov. 28. The overnight curfew is in effect beginning Monday night, Nov 30.

District Changes
The San Mateo County Community College is making the following changes to its operations as a result of the move to purple Tier 1:

  • Indoor athletics and conditioning for sports teams at Cañada College, College of San Mateo, and Skyline College are canceled immediately
  • Indoor operations at San Mateo Athletic Club are canceled immediately (note that the outdoor pool and outdoor fitness center are open subject to COVID-19 restrictions).

Essential employees working onsite should continue to report to work as scheduled. Limited face-to-face classes will continue to meet as planned until further notice.

For more information on the change to purple Tier 1, see:
San Mateo County announcement
State of California County Status Page